Great Organic Gardening Tips That Will Help You Out

Having a beautiful garden is the dream of many a homeowner. No doubt, you have had those dreams as well. Even if you think that you do not have a green thumb, you can make small improvements in your garden by following some practical advice. You can start by reading these suggestions:

If frost has killed your pumpkins before they’ve had a chance to turn orange, it’s not too late to save them. Cut the pumpkins off the vine, leaving a minimum of 4 inches of the vine on the top of the pumpkin. Wash them thoroughly with water mixed with a small amount of bleach to prevent the development of mold. Bring them inside, and place them in a warm, sunny location, turning them occasionally so the sun can reach all the green areas of the pumpkin. Within a few weeks or less, you’ll have bright orange pumpkins to carve into jack-o-lanterns or use to make homemade pumpkin pie.

Stinkbugs can be a nuisance in the garden. These bugs are known to be proliferate in the cooler fall months. They like beans, peppers, tomatoes and many fruits. Proper measures should be taken in order to ensure minimal damage to your crops.

Consider getting a soil analysis report for the dirt in your garden. This procedure is relatively inexpensive and can tell you the type of nutrients you should add to your soil in order to have a more productive garden. A local farm supply or co-op can look through the report and guide you on what to buy.

To create nutrient rich soil for your garden in advance, gather unused fish parts and bury them in the soil. Leave the fish parts untouched in the soil for as long as you can before planting over it. For best results, be sure to bury the fish parts at least 8 inches in the ground.

Create a non-toxic treatment for black spots on roses. Combine one tablespoon of baking soda, one tablespoon of vegetable oil and one drop of liquid detergent in one gallon of water and shake. Fill a spray bottle with this mixture and when the humidity rises, spray your roses down – making sure to get both sides of the leaves.

Use plants to get some autumn color. That need not be the case though! In terms of colorful foliage, fall is the time of year admired by many. There are a number of trees that provide exuberant displays of color, such as Dogwood, Beech and Maple. Add even more color to your garden by planting shrubs such as hydrangea, barberry or cotoneaster.

Did you know that cute lady bugs are beneficial to plants because they kill harmful aphids? Lady beetles, also known as ladybugs, eat large numbers of aphids throughout its life. One beetle can eat 5,000 aphids! You can purchase ladybugs at a garden center, or through online resources, if you don’t have any in your garden. Plants love ladybugs!

Use hostas to brighten up a shady area. Hostas are the perfect plant to brighten up a shady area of your garden. They are grown primarily for their leaves, which range in color from deep blue-green to vivid yellow-green. Blooms are usually lavender, but Hosta Plantaginea features showy, fragrant white flowers. They are best grown in moist, rich soil which has been amended with plenty of compost. Large clumps can easily be divided in the Fall.

When lifting heavy things in your garden it is important to protect your back. You should always lift with your knees when you are lifting anything in the garden. If something is very heavy you should ask someone to help you lift it so that you do not cause damage to your back or knees.

Sometimes when you are growing vegetables or fruits, it can be helpful to cut off newly formed buds or other non-fruit bearing areas. This will stimulate the growth of heavier fruit because the plant re-routes nutrients to where its growth should be navigating. When taking care your garden, it’s important to make the distinction between harvesting the plant, or encouraging its growth.

Use organic mulch. Any material that is spread over the soil is considered mulch. It helps to keep weeds at bay, holds moisture in the soil, and keeps the ground cool in summer and warm in winter. Examples of mulch include compost, shredded leaves, fine wood chips, straw and grass clippings.

A natural, albeit somewhat tedious, way to keep pests and fungus from destroying your organic fruit crop is to use plastic zipper bags. When the fruits are still young on the branches, place them in large zipper bags secured at the top with staples. Cut off a bottom corner to allow for adequate drainage.

When starting your organic garden, don’t forget to plant companion plants. Companion plants are like very friendly neighbors. They can enrich the soil and keep pests away from your other plants. By planting them together, you can avoid the use of harmful pesticides or artificial fertilizer products.

So, now that picture of a dream garden is not so far away. It is within your reach to have a lovely garden. Even if you need more help than perhaps others with a green thumb, no doubt you have found a tip or two that will come in handy! Apply the practical advice given in this article to see your garden grow!