Chemical Free Gardening: Top Tips For An Organic Garden

It’s really no secret that not everyone has a green thumb. Some people couldn’t grow mold if their basement flooded. Gardening is really an acquired skill and not something you luck into. So if you want to grow a garden but just don’t have the confidence or skill-set, use the tips provided below to beef up on your organic gardening.

Use both well-matured compost and mulch in your garden. Compost will naturally help plants grow faster, taller, and healthier, and increase the yield of your vegetables. Mulch helps prevent the growth of weeds. Mulch also shades the ground around the roots of your plants, protecting them from heat and conserving water.

To discourage garden pests of the rodent variety from eating your beautiful perennial flowers and tasty vegetables, brush your dog or cat and use bits of the accumulated hair near the base of the plants being bothered. Garden rodents such as moles, gophers, rabbits and chipmunks can smell a predator and while your little Yorkie may not look like much of a threat, it only takes his scent to ward off the garden troublemakers. Don’t have a dog or cat to brush? Volunteer to brush a neighbor’s pet for the cause!

Weed the garden often and early. Plan on a weeding schedule for the garden at least three times. The first should be five to seven days after sowing, and again seven to ten days after that. The third time should be three to four weeks after planting, by this time the plants should be rooted well enough to add mulching and sufficient leaves to shade the surface.

Treat yourself while you garden with a little petroleum jelly. Before donning your gardening gloves, apply a bit of petroleum jelly or your favorite moisturizing cream to your hands. The gloves protect from the dirt, while your hand movement works the cream into your skin. You will finish your gardening with silky soft hands!

Even if you think you will remember which plants are which later, tag your plants properly from the beginning. Plants can look very different after just a few weeks. Write plant names on flat rocks with a permanent marker in a decorative way, and lay them next to each plant so that you can save yourself from confusion down the road.

Composting for organic gardening reduces the need for fertilizers, is a form of herbicide, can help prevent plant diseases and helps impact the environment in positive ways. Composting is a source of nutrition for insects, helps with soil erosion and reduces waste sent to landfills. It is wonderful for the health of the environment in general.

Plant your own seeds to guarantee organic produce. Sowing your own vegetable seeds gives you the comfort and assurance that your produce has been grown organically from seed to table. Choose plants that are easy to germinate such as broccoli, cabbage, basil and tomatoes. Find out the best time of the year to sprout your chosen produce.

Just as when outside, plants kept inside need varying degrees of sunlight, which can be harder to obtain from indoors. If your home does not let in sufficient light, then consider getting plants that thrive in low-light situations. Otherwise, you could simply use your own lights.

Learn to water your garden efficiently. A soaker hose can be laid in the garden and left on with low water pressure. This frees you up from having to hand-water the plants, so you can do other gardening work. Take care with seedlings, though — they are still delicate and need to be watered by hand.

An important tip for organic gardening that will naturally help prevent disease from appearing in your plants is to move your plants to different spots of your garden each year. This will keep any disease from spreading because the soil doesn’t build up harmful organisms from planting in the same spot each year.

If you notice dry decay at the blossom end of your fruiting vegetables, blossom end rot could be to blame. This is caused by a lack of calcium in your soil. To remedy the rot organically, use eggshells. Crush three or four eggshells and bury them in the soil around the affected plant.

Like so many things in life a good organic garden benefits greatly from advanced planning. The savvy gardener develops an all-encompassing plan for his or her garden before the first seed is planted. Good garden planning takes into account not only the initial plantings, but the subsequent changes that need to be made as the growing season wears on.

If you are going to go organic in your gardening efforts, be sure to mulch your garden with at least 3 inches of organic material. This will help to conserve water, add nutrients and humus to the soil and will discourage weeds. It also gives your garden a nice appearance.

Discourage deer in your garden. Deer love chewing on vegetables, roses, fruit trees, juniper, and holly. They can decimate a garden in a single day if given the chance! While people tend to favor an electric fence to discourage deer, there are certain things you can do that don’t involve unnecessary pain. Fill bags with human or dog hair, dried blood meal, or fish heads. Attach to the perimeter of your property, or to specific plants that could be eaten. Alternatively, make a spray of two egg yolks mixed with one quart of water and spray fruit trees liberally. For some reason, this seems to work!

Developing a skill-set in gardening does not mean you have to possess an aptitude for agriculture, in general. As long as you can follow some fairly basic directions, you should have no trouble, whatsoever, planting and growing a successful garden that is 100% organic. So here’s to your success!